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PostPosted: Tue Dec 05, 2006 2:09 pm 
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Location: Hattiesburg, MS
Weidmanns and sphagetti go hand in hand with me. I always ate that when "Jug" and I went there during our dating years and after we married. Also, the black bottomed pie! Isn't it funny how just reading about these things bring back memories! My favorite memories of Weidmanns is going there after Dusty, DeMolay, Teke dances for breakfast and parties in the "1870" room and breakfast on Sunday mornings (maybe I should say brunch). Also, all the great pictures on the walls. I wish I had known they were taking them down as I would have loved to have the picture of Joe (Jug's brother) that was on the wall with all the service men who were killed in WW2. Wonder what they did with ALL those pictures? Does anyone know?

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Anne & Jug Knight
Classes 1950 & 52


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 05, 2006 4:40 pm 
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Location: Hattiesburg, MS
Oops, "my favorite memories ARE not is" I would hate to get in trouble with the English Profs on here. :lol:

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Anne & Jug Knight
Classes 1950 & 52


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 05, 2006 7:15 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2005 1:37 pm
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Location: Loganville, Ga.
JIMBOB, DONNA IS RIGHT ABOUT THE MEAT. I ALSO HEARD IT WAS VEAL WITH A CHICKEN FRIED BATTER. I HAVE TRIED RECIPES ALSO AND NOTHING COMPARES TO THOSE BACK THEN,

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JUDY SPEED SCRUGGS
CLASS OF 60


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 07, 2006 4:35 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jun 30, 2005 5:53 pm
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Location: Meridian, MS
I've heard several times over the years that the Chic Steak meat was veal. I agree with something that Judy said that Wayne said. That was the great taste of the Chic Steak was the seasoning, whatever it was.

Several years ago, the Meridian Star ran an article on the Chic Steak. One of the staff admitted to me that they stole the idea for the article from our site.

Several people have claimed to have the original Chic Steak recipe. No, I don't remember their names.

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Jeff "Corky" East
Class of 1960

I thank my God in my every remembrance of you, Meridian, and the wonderful childhoods some of us had.


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 Post subject: Favorite things
PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2006 9:08 am 
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Joined: Wed Jun 29, 2005 7:16 am
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Location: Meridian, Mississippi
I sure enjoyed the lunches from Betty Long's take out restuarant near Rileys Hospital. Her fried corn was to die for and her home made pies were the best in town. When I lived in California and was traveling towards Meridian, all I could think about was making it to Longs for a plate lunch and pie.

Jimbob :lol: :lol: :lol:


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2006 10:55 am 
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Location: Clinton, Ms
When I worked at Acme, the Long's had a restaurant on A street, just a block from Acme main. At that point the facility near Rileys was the bake shop for those AWESOME pies. I ate lunch at Long's almost daily when I worked at Acme. The food was SO good.
Oh to have those decisions to make again.....do I want to go to Long's for lunch or do I want to drive out to Freeman's for bar-b-que!! What a choice!! :shock:

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Dent Cermak
Class of '65


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 Post subject: Freeman's
PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2006 11:05 am 
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Location: Meridian, Mississippi
I liked Freemans also but would get angry when I went inside. Mrs. Freeman would be busier than a one armed paper hanger with the itch while Mr. Freeman just sat, doing nothing. I always wanted to tell him to get of his rear and help her.
:lol: :lol: :lol: Jimbob


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 16, 2006 3:19 pm 
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Location: Loganville, Ga.
WATCH IT JIMBOB. I THINK THATS DONNA'S RELATIVES YOU ARE TALKING ABOUT. :lol: :P

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JUDY SPEED SCRUGGS
CLASS OF 60


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 18, 2006 5:58 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jun 30, 2005 5:53 pm
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Location: Meridian, MS
Brent Jackson (MHS '61), a former Meridian Wildcat fullback, and former active member of East End United Methodist Church, is kin to them, too.

I was going to let it ride. Judy didn't. :D :lol: :P

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Jeff "Corky" East
Class of 1960

I thank my God in my every remembrance of you, Meridian, and the wonderful childhoods some of us had.


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 19, 2006 2:09 pm 
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Location: Loganville, Ga.
YOU KNOW ME. :lol: I SAY WHAT COMES TO MIND. :wink:

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JUDY SPEED SCRUGGS
CLASS OF 60


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 19, 2006 9:54 pm 
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Location: Odenville, Alabama
FRANK DENNIS (JEFFS, JUDYS AND MY CLASSMATE AT MHS AND SCOOBA TECH), SENT ME WHAT IS SUPPOSED TO BE THE RECEPIE FOR THE CHICKSTEAK. THE KEY IS "POTATOE FLOUR". DIP POUNDED(LIGHTLY) VEAL, DIP IN MILK THEN IN THE FLOUR, BACK TO THE MILK AND ONCE AGAIN IN THE POTATOE FLOUR. DEEP FRY UNTIL GOLDEN BROWN, DRAIN, PUT A PIECE OF REAL AMERICAN CHEESE ON A FRESH BUN AND--------WAHAW YOU HAVE IT.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 20, 2006 9:08 am 
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Joined: Fri Mar 03, 2006 8:56 am
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Location: Meridian, MS
Where do you get the "potato flour".... I never heard of that one, but there again, I am not the world's most incredible cook ... :lol:

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Linda Massey Dickens
Class of 64


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 20, 2006 10:28 am 
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Location: Mississippi Gulf Coast
There is a bakery in Ocean Springs, MS, that uses potato flour. Their products are delicious. You can’t beat those potato flour doughnuts. The name of the place is the Tato Nut.

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Curtis (Squeakie) Makamson
Class of 1965


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 20, 2006 11:59 pm 
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Location: Meridian, Mississippi
Hey,
I showed up just in time. Somebody let us know how the recipe is.

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Keith Jacoby
Class of 2000

"Save The Past"


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 21, 2006 10:53 am 
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Location: Ozark,AL
Randall....Now Frank would be one to remember the receipe..We ate about a million during our day...WOW...GOOD>>GOOD >>>GOOD....My mom used potato flour in some of her cooking also mmm Good.....But really the pounded veal was the key....

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Our greatest glory lies not in never falling;but in rising every time we fall.


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 22, 2006 4:57 pm 
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Location: Odenville, Alabama
LINDA, I FOUND SOME AT PUBLIX GROCERY. I THINK ANY SPECIALTY FOOD STORE OR HEALTH STORE WOULD CARRY IT.

MIKE, FRANK COULD PUT SOME FOOD DOWN. IM NOT TOO FAR BEHIND HIM. :wink:

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PostPosted: Sat Dec 23, 2006 11:47 am 
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Location: Loganville, Ga.
I WILL TRY IT AFTER CHRISTMAS AND LET YOU KNOW WHAT I THINK.

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JUDY SPEED SCRUGGS
CLASS OF 60


Aspire To Inspire Before You Expire


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 23, 2006 1:44 pm 
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Location: Nashville, TN
Judy, did you get a copy of the original story of the Chic Steak as you left the South Side reunion? There were a couple of them on the table where the pictures were, and I thought you picked one of them up. I wish I had got one.

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Robert Wright
Class of '45


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 23, 2006 10:16 pm 
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Location: Clinton, Ms
Robert, is this it?



History of the Triangle Restaurant
and the Chik-Steak Sandwich

Most people in Meridian during the decade of the 1930s - the era of the Great Depression – have memories filled with "hard times and little money."

Instead of joining the "down-and-out" crowd, one Meridian couple, Glen and Lillian Phipps, seized upon the time as one of opportunity. The result was that they established a name in the city that would last for years yet to come. The Triangle with its Chik-Steak and Dutch apple pie enjoyed the status of a household word for almost forty years.

It all started during the bleak days of 1931 when the Phipps opened their first restaurant at the corner of Seventh Street and 39th Avenue in what had previously been an automobile battery shop. From 10 AM til midnight they tried to entice enough customers to make a profit at their new venture, but business did not come their way.

Deciding they needed a business within walking distance of downtown trade the Phipps moved in a matter of months to a small vacant restaurant behind Klein's Grocery at Seventh Street and 23rd Avenue. With only a counter and eight stools, Glen decided to increase the seating capacity by four booths. They named it the Triangle Restaurant from the shape of the block and they were ready for business.

Money was scarce during the early '30s. A nickel had to go a long way. Trying to help his customers stretch their nickels led Glen Phipps to search for a five-cent sandwich that would fill. He started off with a piece pork loin, wrapped it in a flour and egg batter and fried it in deep fat, placed his product in a bun with ketchup and a slice of dill pickle, thus was the first Chik-Steak born.

His wife, Lillian, gave it its name from the batter resembling that used for frying chicken and the piece of meat looking much like a small steak.


William Carroll Brookshire – a member of the ice cream making family -enjoyed the distinction of buying the first Chik-Steak, at the suggestion of Glen Phipps. According to the story, Brookshire liked the first one, so he ordered a second. Upon his return to the ice cream plant – about a block away - he told one of the employees of the new taste treat. Whereupon the employee headed for the Triangle and ordered two, not one, of what would become Meridian's five-cent eating sensation.

The Triangle Restaurant and the Chik-Steak became one and synonymous, but there were some growing pains. Glen found he couldn't make a profit because of burning so much of the deep fat in which his sandwich was fried. He then heard of the electric fryer with controlled heat. He promptly went to the Mississippi Power Company, which ordered the Triangle the first electric fryer to come to Meridian.

Then there was the day a customer complained to a car hop that the nickel Chik-Steak was too small for his appetite. The car hop reported that to Phipps who thereupon cooked one twice as large for the customer. Thus was born the Jumbo Chik-Steak which sold for ten cents.

Many Meridianites will also remember other Triangle specialties. There was the aforementioned Dutch apple pie for 10 cents, with cheese for 15 cents. Other Depression favorites included a plate lunch with half a fried chicken for 35 cents.

Not ones to stand still, the Phipps enlarged their restaurant, making the main floor larger and adding a balcony. Eventually, when Klein's Grocery closed, the Triangle moved into that space and changed its entrance to face 23rd Avenue across from the World War I monument.

As financial woes eased, their trade increased. By the time of the late '30s and the early '40s and the opening of Camp Shelby, the Triangle had developed beyond the city's borders. Many a soldier passing through had to stop for a Chik-Steak with all the trimmings.


Back in 1936 the owners of the Triangle had opened a new drive-in restaurant on Eighth Street between 44th and 45th Avenues. They introduced another item that developed a popularity of its own, the five cent malt served in a frosted glass – and the frosted malt was born. Beside their drive-in they built the city's only open-air dance pavilion, complete with a juke box. During the summer other customers sat at nearby tables and feasted on ice-cold watermelon as they watched the dancers. This was the era of the jitterbug with all its athletic antics.

Chik-Steak, the sandwich that first brought the Triangle acclaim, began as a pork tenderloin, but was later made primarily of baby beef. And its popularity continued to grow. To protect his culinary masterpiece, Glen Phipps had its name copyrighted. He sold the copyright to two firms on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, but it never enjoyed the popularity there that it had in the Meridian area.

Mrs. Lillian Phipps, in an interview with the writer, was obviously proud of their unique eating sensation of the Depression era. She, however, was quick to add that much of the success of the Triangle could be attributed to hard work, and that many 12 ad 14 hours days were spent by her and her husband in their restaurant.

Glen Phipps died in 1958. The Triangle continued its popularity under
Mrs. Phipps for another 11 years. In 1969 when her lease came up for another five-year renewal, Mrs. Phipps decided that it was time to leave the restaurant business to the younger generation. For her, it was time for retirement.

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Dent Cermak
Class of '65


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Dec 24, 2006 10:49 am 
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Joined: Sun Jul 03, 2005 10:36 am
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Location: Waterford, CT.
I remember both of the Triangles, and eating all of the things mentioned. There was also a Triangle in Jackson. It was on Capitol Ave. out near the park and zoo. I don't know if it was owned by the same people though. I do know that you could get a fried trout with fries for 15 cents. YUM!

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Charlie Haguewood


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